NYU College Advising Corps

NYU College Advising Corps (NYU CAC) aims to increase the number of low-income, first-generation, and underrepresented high school students who enter and complete higher education.  NYU CAC places well-trained recent graduates as full-time college advisers in high-need partner high schools to help students through all steps of the college application process.  NYU CAC is a division of the national College Advising Corps (advisingcorps.org). Advisers work closely with school staff and administration to foster a college-going culture within the schools they serve.  They educate and assist students in submitting financial aid applications, finding scholarships, figuring out college match and fit, revising essays, exploring careers, and preparing for the transition to college.  

What We Do

65% of all jobs in the United States require a postsecondary degree, making a college education crucial for socioeconomic mobility. Yet, high-income students are 30% more likely to enroll in college, compared to low-income students. Additionally, the national student-to-counselor ratio is 482:1, leaving students with an average of just 20 minutes a year with their college counselor. Together, these statistics reveal that low-income high school students are not provided the necessary support and access to higher education -- a disparaging trend that we aim to change here at NYU CAC.

1:1 Meetings with Students

Our near-peer model strongly endorses the student-Adviser relationship, particularly emphasizing the student's interests and goals during the college exploration and application processes.  

Family Engagement

At NYU CAC, we highlight the significant role that our students' families play in college access for our students. As such, we train our students on how to interact with their families when navigating the application process.

College Awareness

To promote college awareness, our Advisers are often tasked with facilitating college representative visits, college fairs, and campus tours at our schools.

FAFSA

Since financial constraints often pose the largest roadblock in the college application process for our students, our Advisers aim to help every student at their schools apply for federal student aid. 

College Applications

In an effort to increase equity in college access, our Advisers aim to assist every student at their schools in applying to college. To do so, we help our students create balanced college lists, consisting of safety, match, and reach schools. 

SAT/ACT

To help our students develop competitive college applications, our Advisers ensure that all their students receive appropriate preparation for and take the SAT/ACT multiple times to maximize their test scores. 

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NYU CAC at a Glance

NYU CAC is part of a nationwide consortium of Advising Corps universities serving 210,000 students at over 670 high schools in sixteen states. The Advising Corps model is unique from other college access programs because it:

  • Uses a near-peer model, placing recent college graduates who can easily relate to and serve as role models for students being served.

  • Provides full-time advisement (every day, all day) in the school setting.

  • Is accessible to ALL students in the partner school.

  • Engages research-based match and fit strategy for college advising and placement.

  • Anchors at postsecondary institutions (e.g., NYU) where knowledge and resources are available to support the program.

The Need for NYU CAC

By 2020, 65% of all jobs in the United States will require a postsecondary degree, making a college education crucial for socioeconomic mobility. Yet, high-income students are 30% more likely to enroll in college, compared to low-income students. Additionally, the national student-to-counselor ratio is 482:1, leaving students with an average of just 20 minutes a year with their college counselor. Together, these statistics reveal that low-income high school students are not provided the necessary support and access to higher education -- a disparaging trend that we aim to change here at NYU CAC.